The Microgenetic Method

Date: 
Saturday, June 1, 1991
Resource Type:
Peer-reviewed article | Research Products
Environment Type: 
Informal/Formal Connections, K-12 Programs
Audience: 
Elementary School Children (6-10) | Pre-K Children (0-5) | Educators/Teachers | Museum/ISE Professionals | Scientists
Discipline: 
Education and learning science | Social science and psychology
Organization:
Carnegie Mellon University
Description: 

Progress in understanding cognitive developmental change mechanisms requires methods that yield detailed data about particular changes. The microgenetic method is an approach that can yield such data. It involves (a) observations of individual children throughout the period of the change, (b) a high density of observations relative to the rate of change within that period, and (c) intensive trial-by-trial analyses intended to infer the processes that gave rise to the change. This approach can illuminate both qualitative and quantitative aspects of change, indicate the conditions under which changes occur, and yield otherwise unobtainable information about short-lived transition strategies. The cost in time and effort of such studies is often high, but the value of the information about change can more than justify the cost.

Citation
ISSN:
0003-066X
Publication Name: 
American Psychologist
Volume: 
45
Number: 
6
Page Number: 
606

Team Members

Robert SieglerRobert SieglerAuthor

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