Cracking the Gender Code: Get 3x More Women in Computing

Date: 
Friday, January 1, 2016
Resource Type:
Report | Reference Materials
Environment Type: 
Public Programs, Afterschool Programs, Summer and Extended Camps, Informal/Formal Connections, K-12 Programs, Higher Education Programs
Audience: 
Middle School Children (11-13) | Youth/Teen (up to 17) | Administration/Leadership/Policymakers | Educators/Teachers | Museum/ISE Professionals
Discipline: 
Computing and information science | Technology
Access and Inclusion: 
Women and Girls
Organization:
Accenture Research, Girls Who Code
Description: 

The “Fourth Industrial Revolution” is transforming the world of work. Just as it happened with the technologies of the steam, electricity and computer revolutions, digital technologies are now becoming pervasive and reshaping all parts of the global economy. The computing industry’s rate of job creation in the U.S. is now three times the U.S. national average. This rapid expansion of the computing workforce means that computing skills – with coding at the core – are the most sought-after skills in the American job market.

Yet amid this boom, research by Accenture and Girls Who Code shows that women’s share of the U.S. computing workforce is declining. On current trends, women will hold only one in five computing jobs in the U.S. by 2025. This is a national crisis with severe implications for America’s place in the global economy and for the future of women.

This report summarizes findings from the research by Accenture and Girls Who Code. The project included a large-scale survey of girls aged 12-18 years old, undergraduate college students, and other key stakeholders to understand the state of girls’ interest in computing at each stage of their education. It also includes recommendations on what America can do to close the gender skills gap in computing, better meet the needs of a rapidly changing job market, and improve U.S. competitiveness.

Funder(s): 
Private Foundation
Document:

Team Members

Kate HarrisonKate HarrisonContact

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