The historical context of science and education at the American Museum of Natural History

Date: 
Sunday, April 1, 2007
Resource Type:
Peer-reviewed article | Research Products
Environment Type: 
Public Programs, Museum and Science Center Programs, Professional Development, Conferences, and Networks, Professional Development and Workshops, Exhibitions, Museum and Science Center Exhibits, Informal/Formal Connections, K-12 Programs
Audience: 
Middle School Children (11-13) | General Public | Educators/Teachers | Museum/ISE Professionals
Discipline: 
General STEM | History/policy/law
Access and Inclusion: 
Ethnic/Racial
Black/African American Communities
Hispanic/Latinx Communities
Indigenous and Tribal Communities
Immigrant Communities
Low Socioeconomic Status
Urban
Organization:
American Museum of Natural History
Description: 

In this article I critically examine the historical context of science education in a natural history museum and its relevance to using museum resources to teach science today. I begin with a discussion of the historical display of race and its relevance to my practice of using the Museum’s resources to teach science. I continue with a critical review of the history of the education department in a natural history museum to demonstrate the historical constitution of current practices of the education department. Using sociocultural constructs around identity formation and transformation, I move to the present with a case study of a teacher who transforms the structure of science education in her classroom and school as a result of her identity transformation and association with a museum-based professional education program.

Citation
ISSN:
1871-1502
DOI:
10.1007/s11422-007-9059-8
Publication Name: 
Cultural Studies of Science Education
Volume: 
2
Number: 
2
Page Number: 
393-440

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