An inconvenient source? Attributes of science documentaries and their effects on information-related behavioral intentions

Date: 
Wednesday, June 20, 2018
Resource Type:
Peer-reviewed article | Research Products
Environment Type: 
Media and Technology, Broadcast Media
Audience: 
Administration/Leadership/Policymakers | General Public | Museum/ISE Professionals | Scientists
Discipline: 
Climate
Organization:
University of Utah, North Carolina State University, Iowa State University, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Description: 

We investigate the impact of a science documentary on individuals' intention to engage in information-related behaviors by experimentally testing the effects of source type (scientist, politician, or anonymous source) and communication setting (interview or lecture) using a manipulated clip from the documentary, ‘An Inconvenient Truth’. Our results indicate that, compared to anonymous sources, use of authoritative ones result in greater intention to engage in some information-related behaviors. Additionally, our results suggest that increased intentions to engage in exchanging information can be attributed to negative affect induced by the clip featuring a politician. Implications for documentary films and science communication are discussed.

Citation
DOI:
10.22323/2.17020207
ISSN:
1824-2049
Publication Name: 
Journal of Science Communication
Volume: 
17
Number: 
2
Document:

Team Members

Sara YeoSara YeoAuthor
Andrew BinderAndrew BinderAuthor
Michael DahlstromMichael DahlstromAuthor
Dominique BrossardDominique BrossardAuthor

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