A Longitudinal Study of Equity-Oriented STEM-Rich Making Among Youth From Historically Marginalized Communities

Date: 
Saturday, February 27, 2016
Resource Type:
Peer-reviewed article | Research Products
Environment Type: 
Public Programs, Making and Tinkering Programs
Audience: 
Middle School Children (11-13) | Museum/ISE Professionals
Discipline: 
Art, music, and theater | Engineering | General STEM | Technology
Access and Inclusion: 
Ethnic/Racial
Black/African American Communities
Hispanic/Latinx Communities
Women and Girls
Low Socioeconomic Status
Organization:
Michigan State University, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Description: 

The maker movement has evoked interest for its role in breaking down barriers to STEM learning. However, few empirical studies document how youth are supported over time, in STEM-rich making projects or their outcomes. This longitudinal critical ethnographic study traces the development of 41 youth maker projects in two community-centered making programs. Building a conceptual argument for an equity-oriented culture of making, the authors discuss the ways in which making with and in community opened opportunities for youth to project their communities’ rich culture knowledge and wisdom onto their making, while also troubling and negotiating the historicized injustices they experience. The authors also discuss how community engagement legitimized a practice of co-making, which supported equity-oriented goals and outcomes.

Funder(s): 
NSF
Funding Program: 
AISL
Award Number: 
1421116
Citation
DOI:
10.3102/0002831218758668
Publication Name: 
American Education Research Journal
Volume: 
55
Number: 
4
Page Number: 
761-800

Team Members

Edna TanEdna TanAuthor

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